Canvas-guider (no)Nylige oppdateringer

Nylige oppdateringer

  • A peer review assignment enables students to provide feedback on another student's assignment submission. Peer reviews are a tool that allows communication between students and can help students master the concepts of a course and learn from each other. Peer reviews can be assigned to show student names or display anonymously.

  • As an instructor, you can enable Turnitin as part of a new Canvas assignment. Turnitin is enabled on a per-assignment basis in Canvas. Turnitin uses your user role for authentication and uses your Canvas account to create and manage assignments. TAs can also access Turnitin assignments.

    Creating a Turnitin assignment means creating the assignment in Canvas and confirming the Turnitin Settings. You may find that the best workflow is to create the assignment, manage Turnitin settings, and then publish the assignment.

    The Turnitin LTI currently includes a few limitations when creating assignments:

    • You cannot use Turnitin with group assignments.
    • Turnitin assignments cannot include more than one submission date; differentiated due dates are not supported.
    • Turnitin submissions require a minimum of 20 words, a maximum of 400 pages, and a file size maximum of 40 MB.
    • You cannot restrict student submission types. By default Turnitin always allows students to submit their assignment as a text entry or upload any supported file type: Text (.txt), Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx), Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt/.pptx), Postcript (.ps), Portable Document Format (.pdf), Rich Text Format (.rtf), HyperText Markup Language (.html), WordPerfect (.wp), Hangul (.hwp), or Open Office (.odt/.ods/.odp). They can also upload an assignment from Google Drive or Dropbox. Turnitin does not allow students to submit unsupported file types.
    • Students cannot submit multiple file uploads.
    • If you want to use a Canvas rubric for the assignment, you must add the rubric before setting the External Tool submission type. Create the assignment with any other submission type, save the assignment, add the rubric, and then edit the assignment to select the External Tool. Students can only view Canvas rubrics for Turnitin assignments on the Submission Details page for that assignment (at any time) or their Grades page (after the rubric has been scored).
    • If you want your assignment to be moderated, you must set up the moderated assignment before setting the External Tool submission type. If you need to return to the moderate page after the External Tool is added, open the assignment and add /moderate after the assignment URL.

     

    Note: The first time you create an assignment, you need to review and agree to the Turnitin User Agreement.

  • Turnitin is the leading academic plagiarism detector, utilized by teachers and students to avoid plagiarism and ensure academic integrity. Your institution may have a Turnitin account that you can use to create Turnitin assignments for your students.

    Canvas uses the Turnitin LTI for assignment submissions, which allows you to manage all Turnitin content and settings within Canvas. The LTI also supports OriginalityCheck, GradeMark, and PeerMark. For more details about the Turnitin LTI tool, please see the Instructor LTI Interface Manual in the Turnitin LTI page.

    Turnitin Login: In the Turnitin LTI, Canvas authenticates student, instructor, and TA roles. You do not need to create a separate Turnitin account to access Turnitin in Canvas. However, if you choose to use the Turnitin website, you will need to use the password reset feature to create a password to the Turnitin web interface.

    Student Submissions: Once you have created and published the assignment, students submit their assignments directly in Canvas. Please note that the Student View does not support Turnitin assignments as the Test Student. Learn how students submit Turnitin assignments.

    Course Copies: If you copy a Turnitin assignment from another course, you will have to re-enable the External Tool Submission Type for each assignment, otherwise the assignment will not be connected to Turnitin.

    Error Messages: Turnitin may occasionally generate an error message about the status of a submission. If a submission includes an error, you can view the message by hovering over the Turnitin icon. If the file failed to resubmit to Turnitin, you can download the student submission and reupload it to Turnitin. If you have questions please contact your Canvas administrator.

    Note: The Turnitin LTI is responsive to the size of your browser window. Your view of the Turnitin LTI may vary from the images shown in this lesson.

  • As part of a Turnitin assignment, you must specify the settings that are allowed for student submissions. Turnitin settings must be created or confirmed before students can view the assignment.

    The LTI currently includes a few limitations in Turnitin settings:

    • By default Turnitin always allows students to submit their assignment as a text entry or upload files that can generate Originality Reports: Text (.txt), Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx), Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt/.pptx/.pps/.ppsx), Microsoft Excel (.xls/.xlsx), PostScript (.ps/.eps), Portable Document Format (.pdf), Rich Text Format (.rtf), HyperText Markup Language (.html), WordPerfect (.wpd), Hangul (.hwp), and Open Office Text (.odt). They can also upload an assignment from Google Drive or Dropbox. In Turnitin settings, you can also allow students to submit any file that is less than 40 MB, has a minimum of 20 words, and is less than 400 pages.
    • Assignments honor Turnitin resubmission settings; they do not automatically allow resubmissions like regular Canvas assignments.

    Note: The Turnitin LTI is responsive to the size of your browser window. Your view of the Turnitin LTI may vary from the images shown in this lesson.

  • Once you have added assignments to your assignment group, you can create rules for the entire assignment group. Assignment group rules determine how Canvas handles any exceptions you want to create for grade calculations. Assignment groups can be weighted or unweighted.

    When using the lowest or highest score rule, an assignment group must include at least one score, plus the number of dropped scores and the number of assignments that should not be dropped. For instance, if you have a rule for dropping three scores and one Never Drop assignment, you would need five student scores in the assignment group to have all three lowest or highest scores dropped.

    Canvas considers how the rule most negatively or positively affects the student's overall score. A rule to drop the lowest score will remove the assignment score(s) from a student's group percentage calculation that will result in the best possible score for that group. A rule to drop the highest score will remove the assignment score(s) from a student's group percentage calculation that will result in the lowest possible score for that group.

    In some cases, the point value may be considered more important than percentage score when determining which assignment to drop. For example, an instructor may set a rule to drop the lowest score in an assignment group, where a student earns a 100% on a 50-point assignment, 65% on a 100-point assignment, and 50% on a 24-point assignment. The 50% score is the lowest percentage, but the 65% score will be dropped as this action provides the student with a better total score for the assignment group than dropping the 50% score.

    Multiple Grading Periods

    If your course includes Multiple Grading Periods, you cannot change assignment group rules once an assignment group has assignments in a closed grading period.

    Additionally, if an assignment group contains assignments that fall into multiple grading periods, grades may have unintended consequences when calculating assignment group rules.

  • You can weight final grades based on assignment groups. Selecting this option assigns a weight to each assignment group, not the assignments themselves. Within each assignment group, a percentage is calculated by dividing the total points a student has earned by the total points possible for all assignments in that group.

    For example, if an assignment group included three assignments totaling 25 points, and a student's scores totaled 15 points, the student would earn 60% for the assignment group (15/25). This percentage is then multiplied by the selected group weight. Each assignment group calculation is added together to create the final grade.

    For example, an instructor may create three assignment groups (A, B, and C) weighted at 20%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. The total score equation for a course with three assignment groups would be (percentage A x weight A) + (percentage B x weight B) + (percentage C x weight C) = final course percentage. If a student scores 75% in Group A, 98% in Group B, and 87% in Group C, the final score would be calculated as (.20 x .75) + (.50 x .98) + (.30 x .87) = .901, or 90.1%.

    The final score calculation is changed if there are no graded items in an assignment group and the Treat Ungraded as 0 option is not selected. In this case, all assignment groups with graded items will be divided by their combined weight, and the assignment groups without graded items are removed from the equation. If the previous example were adjusted so Group C contained no graded discussions, assignments, or quizzes, the calculation for final score would be [(.20 x .75) + (.50 x .98)] ÷ .70 = .9143, or 91.43%.

    Multiple Grading Periods

    If your course includes Multiple Grading Periods, you cannot change assignment group weights once an assignment group has assignments in a closed grading period. Additionally, weighted grading periods can also support weighted assignment groups in a course. The weight of an assignment group is applied to the grading period’s final grade, and each grading period’s final grade is added together to calculate the overall grade.

    If you choose to use weighted assignment groups, separate assignment groups should be created for each grading period in the course. If an assignment group contains assignments that fall into multiple grading periods with different weighted percentages, grades may have unintended consequences.

  • Using Assignment Groups allows you to organize the assignments in your course.

  • Assignment shells are placeholders for Assignments until you edit the Assignment details. You can create an Assignment shell on the Assignments index page. Assignment shells are saved as unpublished assignments.

    Assignment shells can only be created as part of an assignment group. Learn how to add assignment groups.

  • Canvas is built on open web standards and uses minimal instances of Flash, so most features are supported on mobile devices. With the growing use of mobile devices, you should build your courses with best practices for mobile in mind.

  • The Google Drive web service allows you to integrate Canvas with your Google Drive account. All users can authorize their Google Drive accounts for access to Google collaborations and assignment uploads.

    If you need to create a new Google Drive account, please note that you may experience a delay with the Google integration in Canvas until Google has fully completed the account process.

    Note: For any of your courses, if the Course Navigation Menu includes a Google Drive link, your institution or instructor has enabled a global Google Drive integration. You do not need to enable Google Drive as a web service.

    Manual Student guide